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Genuine, original William Hogarth engravings and etchings from Darvill's Rare Prints

William Hogarth was an English painter and printmaker who poignantly commented the English society of the eighteenth century with biting satire. The career and life of Hogarth were as unusual as his prints.

William was born as the son of a shopkeeper (his mother) and a schoolmaster and publisher. The youth of William was overshadowed by the chronic financial problems of his father, who was even imprisoned because of his debts. This humiliating experience formed Hogarth for the rest of his life.

Hogarth started an apprenticeship as a silversmith in 1714, but never finished it. He then tried his luck as an independent engraver for copper plates. His early commissions were for cards, book illustrations and single prints. In 1720, he registered at the John Vanderbank Art Academy. Around 1726 or earlier, he was taught painting by James Thornhill whose daughter he later married. He earned some reputation for theater decoration paintings.

Hogarth experienced his first big financial success with A Harlot's Progress, a series of paintings from which he produced engravings in 1732. Only the engravings survived. The paintings were lost in a fire in 1755.

A Harlot's Progress is a set of 6 prints about the hapless life of a prostitute. It was a completely new kind of genre prints that were referred as moral history subjects.

After the big success of A Harlot's Progress, Hogarth published a male counterpart series, A Rake's Progress - a story in eight plates showing the decline of a promising young man into a life of drinking and immoral behavior.

In 1743, the painting series Marriage à la Mode was completed. It is considered his masterpiece. In Marriage à la Mode Hogarth turned his satire on the follies of the upper classes. The theme of this series is about marriage for money. Although the prints of Marriage à la Mode sold well, the paintings did not. Therefore all prints designed afterwards, were created exclusively as print designs without any painted counterparts.

In 1747 followed the series Industry and Idleness, a moral story of an idle and an industrious apprentice in twelve plates.

In 1753 Hogarth wrote his book The Analysis of Beauty, a wrap-up of his artistic and esthetic principles.

Hogarth was a very controversial and individual character. Driven by a sense for justice, he missed no chance to get into a quarrel with his contemporaries. His most hated enemy was the British politician John Wilkes, whom he had ridiculed in one of his engravings. William Hogarth died on October 26, 1764.

The Times of the Day

The paintings for these prints were executed at the request of Jonathan Tyers for Vauxhall Gardens, an amusement park popular with the aristocracy. They were engraved by Hogarth (I, II, IV) and Bernard Baron (III), a French engraver then living in England. Like many of the works commissioned early in Hogarth's career, the prints of The Four Times of the Day are not as directly didactic as those the artist did for his general audiences, though they may be a subtle attempt to propagandize the aristocratic class on behalf of the proletariat. The series is a sympathetic account and a comic celebration of the everyday lives and entertainments of the common people of London.

[Excerpts from Engravings by Hogarth, edited by Sean Shesgreen (Dover, 1973).]

MORNING BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

MORNING
[Plate I]
Invented, Painted, Engraved and Published by William Hogarth

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 15/16 x 14 13/16 inches

Condition: Excellent, very mild smudges in margin.
A beautiful, dark impression!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Morning
PLATE I

This print depicts the various activities of the people of Covent Garden on a winter's morning. By the clock on Inigo Jone's St. Paul's it is 6:55 A.M. Through the center of the market walks a lady whose austere countenance and fashionable dress are in marked contrast to those around her. Despite the snow and inclement weather, her affectation prompts her to expose her hands and bony chest to the cold. By her side dangles either a nutcracker or a pair of scissors in the form of a skeleton. Though on her way to church, she ignores the painful condition of the freezing page who carries her prayer book; she also evades the glance and outstretched hand of the beggar. She expresses on her face and with her fan the moral horror at the activities of the engaging lovers in front of her. Behind the lovers the night's festivities at "Tom King's Coffee House" (purposefully eclipsing the church) conclude in a brawl which is about to erupt into the street.

Between the church and the tavern (the house with the large ale mug on a post and three small pitchers hanging from the eaves), a blind man escorted by a woman walks to church, and a porter rests to talk to another woman. To the left of the print's judgmental figure, the day's trade has begun. A large woman carts her vegetables to market on her head to the amazement of two little boys who lag in the square on their way to school. A quack with a bottle of "Dr. Rock's" nostrum displays a billboard bearing the royal arms to suggest court patronage.

Two odd-shaped footprints near the page are marks made by iron mountings attached to shoes to keep the wearer above snow and mud.

A statue of Time bearing a scythe and an hourglass stands in warning above the clock, and below it the motto "Sic Transit Gloria Mundi" (Thus passes the glory of the world) in inscribed in judgment on the scene.

 

NOON  BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

NOON
[Plate II]
Invented, Painted, Engraved and Published by William Hogarth

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 11/16 x 14 7/8 inches

Condition: Excellent, very mild smudges in margin.
A beautiful, dark impression!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Noon
PLATE II

This print sets the boisterous, robust lives of the English proletariat against the artificial conduct of the fashionable, affected French residing in England. It is 11:30 on the spire of St. Giles-in-the-Fields. From the church on the right (believed to be an historical church patronized by French refugees), the congregation spills out into the street. Beside a dead cat in the kennel, a beau dressed in an ornamental coat and vest, an oversized bow, velvet breeches and buckled shoes postures affectedly in the direction of a lady. he wears a sword and carries a cane. The lady, dressed every bit as elaborately, returns his gestures in the same stiff, pretentious manner.

In front of them stands what appears to be a diminuitive adult but is actually a little boy dressed in the same ostentatious fashion as the beau, even to the point of wearing a bag wig and miniature sword. He seems to be glancing conceitedly at his dress. Another little boy wearing an outlandish wig shaped like a beehive walks in the opposite direction with a girl taller than he. Those in the congregation whose faces are not affected either wear dour looks or grotesque expressions.

The scenes on the other side of the kennel, set not against a church but against two taverns and an eating house, without a trace of artificial politeness, are marked instead by natural crises and conflicts. Across from the little beau a disheveled boy scratches his full head of hair and cries at his blunder. A girl stuffs one piece of the broken pie in her mouth and grabs for another. Across from the couple expressing their affection with awkward formality, an attractive girl responds to the fondling and kissing of a companion. Her pie is about to fall from her control. Above the inn door portrays a woman without a head which proverbially signified "The Good (i.e. Quiet) Woman." The sign in front of the eating house shows the head of John the Baptist; its inscription, "Good Eating" (enclosed in two parenthetical teeth), appears directly above the lovers.

NOON  BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

EVENING
[Plate III]
Invented, Painted, and Published by William Hogarth
Engraved by B. Baron

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 7/8 x 14 5/8 inches

Condition: Excellent, a few tiny specks in margins.
A beautiful, dark impression!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Evening
PLATE III

This plate depicts the "entertainment" of a middle-class family in which traditional dominance roles have been reversed. A London dyer (in the second state the man's hands were blue to indicate his trade) and his family have left the city to visit "Salers Well," an amusement center of popular appeal. The center of teh print is the coarse, oversized and very pregnant wife who is suffering from the evening's heat. In contrast to her prosaic dress and appearance she affects gloves and a fan with a pretentious mythological subject on it (Venus detaining Adonis from the chase). A formidable personality, she not only tyrannizes her husband but has cuckolded him; the horns of the cow appear above him. He walks by her side, a small, thin figure, obedientlay carrying their youngest child (whose shoe has fallen off ot expose an undarned hole in her sock). The husband bears a helpless, almost hypotized expression on his face.

In front of the couple slouches their pregnant dog gazing at it appearance in the water. Behind the couple their children act out the relationship between their parents. A fierce-looking little girl demands her brother's gingerbread figure as she threatens him with her han; he responds passively with tears (although he has his father's oversized walking stick between his legs). Behind the children their nurse unties one of their shoelaces.

To the right of the nurse a figure milks a cow, indicating the time of day (about 5 P.M.). At the extreme right a group of people sit in a tavern garden, while inside, in one of Hogarth's most peaceful tavern scenes, another set of Londoners, come to enjoy the country, crowd together in a smoky room and drink. The tavern sign bears the portrait of "Sr Hugh Middleton." This person brought water into the City of London from the surrounding countryside. The little canal in the foreground is probably intended as his work. The contrasting landscape in the backgroun presents a quiet pastoral scene.

Night  BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

NIGHT
[Plate III]
Invented, Painted, Engraved and Published by William Hogarth

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 7/16 x 14 7/16 inches

Condition: Excellent, one or two tiny specks in margins.
A beautiful, dark, rich impression!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Night
PLATE IV

Set beside the mock pastoral "Evening," the print "Night," the most turbulent of the series, depicts the common city vices, miseries, violence and turmoil. The oak branches announce that it is May 29th, the day on which restoration of Charles II was celebrated. In fact the scene is singularly devoid of any type of celebration.

In the background a cart of household furniture passes under the statue of Charles I  in Charing Cross; its owners are fleeing their landlord by night. The sky above is filled with fire and smoke. On the left hang: a tavern sign portraying a wide, short glass; a brothel plaque inscribe "The New Bagnio" and a barber-surgeon's pole with a sign showing a man in torture having a tooth pulled. The illustration belies the legend "Shaving Bleeding & Teeth Drawn wth, a Touch/ Ecce Signum" (Behold the Sign). On the other side of the street stands a "Bagnio" and a tavern bearing the sign "Earl of Cardigan."

In the barber's shop a hairdresser-barber-surgeon, blind drunk, has just cut his customer who grips the chair in alarm. Because of the manner in which he holds the man's nose, the customer resembles a pig. Outside the window stand dishes of human blood drawn from the day's patients. Beneath the ledge on which they stand, three homeless people huddle together in sleep, and a linkboy or guide blows his torch to a flame. Next to them a wealthy freemason in ceremonial dress with his carpenter's square around his neck lurches indecorously homeward, led with some difficulty by a patient lodge porter of smaller stature. From the window above, the contents of a chamber pot fall on his head; he responds by threatening the air with his cane; his wise and tolerant guide has confiscated his sword to avoid another battle like the one which has bloodied the mason's forehead.

In the middle of the street "The Salisbury Flying Coach" has overturned in front of a bonfire which seems to have caused the horses to bolt. Their plight is observed by a butcher boy and a youth with a wooden sword. In the midst of all this chaos a man calmly smokes a pipe and pours beer into a large barrel for a street celebration of the Restoration.

 

Complete set of 4 full-page plates
The Four Times of the Day

Original Copperplate Engravings and Etchings from:
The Works of William Hogarth from the Original Plates Restored by James Heath, Esq., R.A.; With the Addition of Many Subjects Not Before Collected: To Which is Prefixed, a Biographical Essay on the Genius and Productions of Hogarth, and Explanations on the Subjects of the Plates by John Nichols, Esq., F.S.A.

London: Printed for Baldwin, Cradock & Joy, Paternoster Row
by Nichols and Son, Parliament Street
— 1822 —

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ANOTHER AVAILABLE SET

  Please note: the shipping charge for these plates may need to be adjusted
  to account for a higher insurance value.
If necessary, we will send you a secure electronic invoice for the additional amount.
Please be sure to check your email. Thank you.
MORNING BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

MORNING
[Plate I]
Invented, Painted, Engraved and Published by William Hogarth

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 15/16 x 14 13/16 inches

Condition: Very Good to Excellent, damp stain in upper right corner away from image area; some minor foxing, mainly in margins.
A beautiful, dark impression!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Morning
PLATE I

This print depicts the various activities of the people of Covent Garden on a winter's morning. By the clock on Inigo Jone's St. Paul's it is 6:55 A.M. Through the center of the market walks a lady whose austere countenance and fashionable dress are in marked contrast to those around her. Despite the snow and inclement weather, her affectation prompts her to expose her hands and bony chest to the cold. By her side dangles either a nutcracker or a pair of scissors in the form of a skeleton. Though on her way to church, she ignores the painful condition of the freezing page who carries her prayer book; she also evades the glance and outstretched hand of the beggar. She expresses on her face and with her fan the moral horror at the activities of the engaging lovers in front of her. Behind the lovers the night's festivities at "Tom King's Coffee House" (purposefully eclipsing the church) conclude in a brawl which is about to erupt into the street.

Between the church and the tavern (the house with the large ale mug on a post and three small pitchers hanging from the eaves), a blind man escorted by a woman walks to church, and a porter rests to talk to another woman. To the left of the print's judgmental figure, the day's trade has begun. A large woman carts her vegetables to market on her head to the amazement of two little boys who lag in the square on their way to school. A quack with a bottle of "Dr. Rock's" nostrum displays a billboard bearing the royal arms to suggest court patronage.

Two odd-shaped footprints near the page are marks made by iron mountings attached to shoes to keep the wearer above snow and mud.

A statue of Time bearing a scythe and an hourglass stands in warning above the clock, and below it the motto "Sic Transit Gloria Mundi" (Thus passes the glory of the world) in inscribed in judgment on the scene.

 

NOON BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

NOON
[Plate II]
Invented, Painted, Engraved and Published by William Hogarth

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 11/16 x 14 7/8 inches

Condition: Very Good to Excellent, damp stain in upper right corner away from image area; some minor foxing, mainly in margins.
A beautiful, dark impression!!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Noon
PLATE II

This print sets the boisterous, robust lives of the English proletariat against the artificial conduct of the fashionable, affected French residing in England. It is 11:30 on the spire of St. Giles-in-the-Fields. From the church on the right (believed to be an historical church patronized by French refugees), the congregation spills out into the street. Beside a dead cat in the kennel, a beau dressed in an ornamental coat and vest, an oversized bow, velvet breeches and buckled shoes postures affectedly in the direction of a lady. he wears a sword and carries a cane. The lady, dressed every bit as elaborately, returns his gestures in the same stiff, pretentious manner.

In front of them stands what appears to be a diminuitive adult but is actually a little boy dressed in the same ostentatious fashion as the beau, even to the point of wearing a bag wig and miniature sword. He seems to be glancing conceitedly at his dress. Another little boy wearing an outlandish wig shaped like a beehive walks in the opposite direction with a girl taller than he. Those in the congregation whose faces are not affected either wear dour looks or grotesque expressions.

The scenes on the other side of the kennel, set not against a church but against two taverns and an eating house, without a trace of artificial politeness, are marked instead by natural crises and conflicts. Across from the little beau a disheveled boy scratches his full head of hair and cries at his blunder. A girl stuffs one piece of the broken pie in her mouth and grabs for another. Across from the couple expressing their affection with awkward formality, an attractive girl responds to the fondling and kissing of a companion. Her pie is about to fall from her control. Above the inn door portrays a woman without a head which proverbially signified "The Good (i.e. Quiet) Woman." The sign in front of the eating house shows the head of John the Baptist; its inscription, "Good Eating" (enclosed in two parenthetical teeth), appears directly above the lovers.

EVENING BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

EVENING
[Plate III]
Invented, Painted, and Published by William Hogarth
Engraved by B. Baron

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 7/8 x 14 5/8 inches

Condition: Very Good to Excellent, damp stain in upper right corner away from image area; some minor foxing, mainly in margins.
A beautiful, dark impression!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Evening
PLATE III

This plate depicts the "entertainment" of a middle-class family in which traditional dominance roles have been reversed. A London dyer (in the second state the man's hands were blue to indicate his trade) and his family have left the city to visit "Salers Well," an amusement center of popular appeal. The center of teh print is the coarse, oversized and very pregnant wife who is suffering from the evening's heat. In contrast to her prosaic dress and appearance she affects gloves and a fan with a pretentious mythological subject on it (Venus detaining Adonis from the chase). A formidable personality, she not only tyrannizes her husband but has cuckolded him; the horns of the cow appear above him. He walks by her side, a small, thin figure, obedientlay carrying their youngest child (whose shoe has fallen off ot expose an undarned hole in her sock). The husband bears a helpless, almost hypotized expression on his face.

In front of the couple slouches their pregnant dog gazing at it appearance in the water. Behind the couple their children act out the relationship between their parents. A fierce-looking little girl demands her brother's gingerbread figure as she threatens him with her han; he responds passively with tears (although he has his father's oversized walking stick between his legs). Behind the children their nurse unties one of their shoelaces.

To the right of the nurse a figure milks a cow, indicating the time of day (about 5 P.M.). At the extreme right a group of people sit in a tavern garden, while inside, in one of Hogarth's most peaceful tavern scenes, another set of Londoners, come to enjoy the country, crowd together in a smoky room and drink. The tavern sign bears the portrait of "Sr Hugh Middleton." This person brought water into the City of London from the surrounding countryside. The little canal in the foreground is probably intended as his work. The contrasting landscape in the backgroun presents a quiet pastoral scene.

EVENING BY WM HOGARTH

(click image to enlarge— Darvill's electronic watermark does not appear on actual engraving)

NIGHT
[Plate III]
Invented, Painted, Engraved and Published by William Hogarth

(Heath edition, 1822)

Sheet size: approx. 25 1/4 inches x 19 1/4 inches
Plate size: approx. 17 7/16 x 14 7/16 inches

Condition: Very Good to Excellent, damp stain in upper right corner away from image area; some minor foxing, mainly in margins.
A beautiful, dark impression!

[For sale in a complete set of full page engravings, see below for details]

Night
PLATE IV

Set beside the mock pastoral "Evening," the print "Night," the most turbulent of the series, depicts the common city vices, miseries, violence and turmoil. The oak branches announce that it is May 29th, the day on which restoration of Charles II was celebrated. In fact the scene is singularly devoid of any type of celebration.

In the background a cart of household furniture passes under the statue of Charles I  in Charing Cross; its owners are fleeing their landlord by night. The sky above is filled with fire and smoke. On the left hang: a tavern sign portraying a wide, short glass; a brothel plaque inscribe "The New Bagnio" and a barber-surgeon's pole with a sign showing a man in torture having a tooth pulled. The illustration belies the legend "Shaving Bleeding & Teeth Drawn wth, a Touch/ Ecce Signum" (Behold the Sign). On the other side of the street stands a "Bagnio" and a tavern bearing the sign "Earl of Cardigan."

In the barber's shop a hairdresser-barber-surgeon, blind drunk, has just cut his customer who grips the chair in alarm. Because of the manner in which he holds the man's nose, the customer resembles a pig. Outside the window stand dishes of human blood drawn from the day's patients. Beneath the ledge on which they stand, three homeless people huddle together in sleep, and a linkboy or guide blows his torch to a flame. Next to them a wealthy freemason in ceremonial dress with his carpenter's square around his neck lurches indecorously homeward, led with some difficulty by a patient lodge porter of smaller stature. From the window above, the contents of a chamber pot fall on his head; he responds by threatening the air with his cane; his wise and tolerant guide has confiscated his sword to avoid another battle like the one which has bloodied the mason's forehead.

In the middle of the street "The Salisbury Flying Coach" has overturned in front of a bonfire which seems to have caused the horses to bolt. Their plight is observed by a butcher boy and a youth with a wooden sword. In the midst of all this chaos a man calmly smokes a pipe and pours beer into a large barrel for a street celebration of the Restoration.

 

Complete set of 4 full-page plates
The Four Times of the Day

Original Copperplate Engravings and Etchings from:
The Works of William Hogarth from the Original Plates Restored by James Heath, Esq., R.A.; With the Addition of Many Subjects Not Before Collected: To Which is Prefixed, a Biographical Essay on the Genius and Productions of Hogarth, and Explanations on the Subjects of the Plates by John Nichols, Esq., F.S.A.

London: Printed for Baldwin, Cradock & Joy, Paternoster Row
by Nichols and Son, Parliament Street
— 1822 —

$1,750
(sold as a complete set of 4 full-page original engravings only,
scroll down for any individual plates that may be available)

  Please note: the shipping charge for these plates may need to be adjusted
  to account for a higher insurance value.
If necessary, we will send you a secure electronic invoice for the additional amount.
Please be sure to check your email. Thank you.
 
The Works of William Hogarth by Rev. John Trusler
published by Jones and Co, London (1833)

Times of the Day: Morning
(click image to enlarge)

Times of the Day
MORNING


"The Works of William Hogarth
in a Series of Engravings: with descriptions and a
Comment on Their Moral Tendency
by the Rev. John Trusler"

(Jones and Co., Temple of the Muses, (Late Lackington's), Finsbury Square, London, 1833)

Original 180+-year-old copperplate engraving

Sheet size: 8 1/4 x 10 1/2 inches
original text accompanies engraving


Condition: Good, with some foxing in margins and one spot in upper right of image. Please refer to detailed scan by clicking on thumbnail image provided.

SOLD AS A COMPLETE SET OF 4, SEE BELOW

Times of the Day: Noon
(click image to enlarge)

Times of the Day
NOON


"The Works of William Hogarth
in a Series of Engravings: with descriptions and a
Comment on Their Moral Tendency
by the Rev. John Trusler"

(Jones and Co., Temple of the Muses, (Late Lackington's), Finsbury Square, London, 1833)

Original 180+-year-old copperplate engraving

Sheet size: 8 1/4 x 10 1/2 inches
original text accompanies engraving


Condition: Very Good. Please refer to detailed scan by clicking on thumbnail image provided.

SOLD AS A COMPLETE SET OF 4, SEE BELOW

Times of the Day: EVENING
(click image to enlarge)

Times of the Day
EVENING


"The Works of William Hogarth
in a Series of Engravings: with descriptions and a
Comment on Their Moral Tendency
by the Rev. John Trusler"

(Jones and Co., Temple of the Muses, (Late Lackington's), Finsbury Square, London, 1833)

Original 180+-year-old copperplate engraving

Sheet size: 8 1/4 x 10 1/2 inches
original text accompanies engraving


Condition: Very Good. Please refer to detailed scan by clicking on thumbnail image provided.

SOLD AS A COMPLETE SET OF 4, SEE BELOW

Times of the Day: NIGHT
(click image to enlarge)

Times of the Day
NIGHT


"The Works of William Hogarth
in a Series of Engravings: with descriptions and a
Comment on Their Moral Tendency
by the Rev. John Trusler"

(Jones and Co., Temple of the Muses, (Late Lackington's), Finsbury Square, London, 1833)

Original 180+-year-old copperplate engraving

Sheet size: 8 1/4 x 10 1/2 inches
original text accompanies engraving


Condition: Good, some foxing. Please refer to detailed scan by clicking on thumbnail image provided.

SOLD AS A COMPLETE SET OF 4, SEE BELOW

COMPLETE SET OF FOUR ORIGINAL COPPERPLATE ENGRAVINGS
"TIMES OF THE DAY"
(Trusler, 1833)

$150

Noon
(click image to enlarge)

Times of the Day
Noon


"The Complete Works of William Hogarth"
(Mackenzie, London, 1870)

Sheet size: 8 3/4 x 12 1/4 inches
(steel engraving)

Condition: Excellent (one fox mark in extreme lower right)

(note: entire sheet is too large to scan)

$20

Evening
(click image to enlarge)

Times of the Day
Evening


"The Complete Works of William Hogarth"
(Mackenzie, London, 1870)

Sheet size: 8 3/4 x 12 1/4 inches
(steel engraving)

Condition: Excellent

(note: entire sheet is too large to scan)

$20

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